Academia Cotopaxi
Academia Cotopaxi

Assessment Practices

Assessment is a major area of focus for Academia Cotopaxi and we are learning from current educational research. The traditional approach to assessment uses conventional methods of testing how well students can recall knowledge that was taught, usually producing a written document such as a quiz, test, exam or term paper, designed and graded by the teacher or educational institution. Often in this traditional approach, the grade received was final and there was no follow-up afterwards – this is often called summative assessment. The same assessment can be used in either a summative way (telling the teacher how good the student is in math) or in a formative way (telling the teacher what to do next). What we now know from current educational research is that formative assessment radically improves student achievement. Using assessment in a formative manner has a powerful impact on learning! The research is telling us that the process – in which evidence about student achievement is used by teachers or learners to make better decisions about the next steps in instruction – is a powerful process that positively impacts learning. That is why we are increasing our efforts to embed formative assessment into all our classes. Formative Assessment happens at the beginning or during the learning process using a variety of informal and formal strategies in which teachers check for understanding. These assessments provide ongoing information about what learners already know and where there are gaps or misconceptions in their learning. Based on results of these assessments, teachers can then design the most appropriate next steps in instruction. Feedback from teachers, peers, or one’s self enables students to know what and how to practice and improve. Students demonstrate their learning using a variety of teacher-designed assessments such as anecdotal records, teacher observations, authentic tasks, checklists, charts, conferences, contracts, games, diagnostic inventories, portfolios, simulations, journals, projects, question and answer, tests, and quizzes. These are all useful and appropriate ways to assess conceptual understanding, competencies or skills, or character development. Teachers use checklists or rubrics to evaluate student performance or understanding, providing samples in advance so that students understand what is expected. Standardized assessments are also used, such as the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP), IB external exams, and SAT tests. Externally evaluated, these assessments provide comparison data for our school. Our grading practices are shifting from a traditional model to a more accurate report on learning. Our past practice was to combine everything into one grade – academic knowledge and skills, behavior in class, attendance, homework completion, class participation. This approach didn’t provide an accurate report on what a student knew in each subject, nor did it provide a record of how well a student was demonstrating growth as a learner. Beginning in the 2015-2016 school year, in Grades 6-12, students will receive one grade for conceptual understanding of the subject, as well as feedback about their Habits and Attitudes to Learning in that subject, based on a specific rubric. Separating these two areas will provide a more accurate report on two very different and important areas of learning. We believe this approach provides students meaningful feedback about themselves upon which they can reflect and set goals for improvement.

Teaching and Learning